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Human Resource Management

Assignment 3: The Law and Ethical Considerations This assignment allows you to d

Assignment 3: The Law and Ethical Considerations
This assignment allows you to demonstrate mastery of the following course outcomes:
Analyze employment related laws, and ethical considerations their application, and implications in the workplace
Evaluate rights, obligations, and liabilities in the employment process and relationship.
Evaluate compliance with current laws and regulations related to safety and fairness in the workplace.
Effectively communicate to internal and external audiences the principles and application of employment laws and ethical considerations in the business environment.
Social Media in the Workplace
Overview: There are times when HR professionals are faced with workplace situations where the laws and policies are evolving and yet ethical considerations need to be addressed. Below is an emerging workplace situation where there is no absolute right or wrong answer, but the situation needs to be analyzed from various points of view.
Descriiption of the situation: An employee posted derogatory remarks about the organization and about another worker on Facebook. The organization’s policies does not address free expression just “offensive” and “harmful” speech. The supervisor is concerned that the posting was dehumanizing, humiliating and could incite hatred again persons or groups because of their race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or disability. The supervisor comes to the HR manager to ask for guidance on how to address the employee.
Action: Respond to all questions below. Utilize resources from the class and make sure to have at least three sources as part of your final paper. Answer each of the questions in narrative form (not bullet points). Use the outline below as a way to organize your response and comments.
Applying the SHRM Code of Ethics: Describe what aspects of the SHRM Code of Ethics would apply in this situation from the perspective role of an HR professional? https://www.shrm.org/about-shrm/Pages/code-of-ethics.aspx

Legal and Ethical Considerations: What are the various considerations that need to be discussed regarding facts, affected parties, and who should be involved?
Identify and summarize the relevant facts. Describe key facts along with any policies, procedures, guidelines, best practices, applicable laws and regulations, and handbooks/internal publications.
Identify affected parties. Describe who is likely to be impacted.
Identify who should be involved in any resolution. Identify who, as well as when and why they should be involved.

Possible Courses of Action: What might be some possible courses of action as it relates to the following:
What are potential legal remedies that can be taken?
What policies or procedures need to be reviewed, revised, or created?
What role should the HR professional play in this situation?
What kind of employee training might be needed in the future to address this concern?
What advice would you as the HR professional provide to the supervisor?
Formatting directions for this assignment #3.
Use the bolded headings found in the outline above in your paper to denote the different questions.
Paper must be in APA 7.0 style, narrative format (not in bullet points nor PowerPoint).
Should be approximately 2-4 written narrative pages, double spaced
Include a cover page which should have student name and title of your paper.
Include a reference section at the end of your paper with at least 3 citations/references in APA 7.0 style format.
Use a word-processing software and saved with a .doc, .docx, or .rtf extension. Do not submit in a pdf format.
Upload the paper to your Assignments Folder by the due date.
The paper is to be posted in Assignment #3 drop box.
The grading rubric for this assignment is in the Assignment Folder, or can be opened by clicking on the ‘Assignment #3 Grading Rubric’ tab in the lower right corner of the screen if you opened the Assignment in Content.
Additional Reference Material
How to Create an Effective Social Media Policy (SHRM)
Sample Social Media Policy (SHRM)
Updated 2022

Categories
Human Resource Management

Scenario You are the HR Manager in a shipping distribution company (make up what

Scenario
You are the HR Manager in a shipping distribution company (make up whatever name you want when writing this). Recently, it was discovered that several employees in the procurement department were committing fraud by accepting vendor kickbacks and by falsifying receipts to overstate the prices of items purchased for the company. These employees have been terminated from the organization. However, the CEO is worried that the unethical attitudes and practices may be more widespread within this department. Therefore, she has ordered that the entire department must undergo ethics training, and must switch to a new process for negotiating contracts, selecting vendors, and purchasing of the resources needed for the organization. The remaining employees in the department have all been working there for at least 15 years and will likely be resistant to adapting to the new required processes.
As HR Manager, you realize that as part of the planning for the new process implementation, you need to identify what factors would contribute the most to employee resistance as well as identify what actions could be taken to mitigate this resistance better. In order to determine this information, you decide to create a Force Field Analysis, as based on Kurt Lewin’s three-stage theory of change.
Instructions
• APA Format
• 9 Scholarly Citations (relevant2015 -2022)
• Always connect/relate back to the scenario, make up businesses, this needs to be done like a creative writing, so bring the imagination. (review the attached document with rubric specific information for further instructions and guidance it goes into great detail and provides you the information that needs to be discussed in each section).
Prepare a force field analysis that:
• Identifies the area for change in the procurement department.
• Performs all seven steps of the force field analysis.
• Creates a force field visual diagram with appropriate labels.
• Provides a narrative explanation of the analysis conducted.
• Describes that action steps selected for implementation along with the rationale for each action step.
• Provides attribution for credible sources used in the force field analysis.

Categories
Human Resource Management

Before you begin the assignment, read the Inside Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh’s radical

Before you begin the assignment, read the Inside Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh’s radical management experiment that prompted 14% of employees to quit Links to an external site. article.
For this interactive assignment, you are to take on the role of an internal consultant that has been tasked with transitioning a large, traditionally multi-tier organization into a holacracy. Your role as an internal consultant is to create a 7- to 10-slide PowerPoint presentation for the executive board that addresses the following elements of the change initiative.
A descriiption of holacracy.
Justify the need for change from the current management model to holacracy.
Use Kotter’s eight-step change leadership model to explain how you would implement holacracy.
Describe the proposed change using each of Kotter’s eight steps of change leadership:
Establishing a sense of urgency
Creating a guiding coalition
Developing a vision and strategy
Communicating the change vision
Empowering broad-based action
Generating short-term wins
Consolidating gains and producing more change
Anchoring new approaches in the culture
Explain some of the anticipated problems that may occur and recommend possible solutions.
A references slide with a minimum of two scholarly and/or credible sources.
Attach the PowerPoint presentation to your initial post. Create an email to the executive board that addresses the purpose of your change management initiative. Provide a detailed explanation of why holacracy is a better fit for the organization.
Your initial post should be a minimum of 250 words.
Here is the article:
Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh reveals what it was like losing 18% of his employees in a radical management experiment — and why it was worth it
Richard Feloni
January 28, 2016
Tony Hsieh TBI Interview illustration
Tony Hsieh TBI Interview illustration
(Mike Nudelman/Business Insider)
A few days into the new year, 50 employees quit their jobs at Zappos. That was OK with CEO Tony Hsieh.
It was the deadline for the 150 employees working on an intensive tech project to decide if they wanted to take a severance package or begin working under the self-management system known as Holacracy. Under it, there are no traditional bosses or job titles, and the standard hierarchy is eliminated.
Hsieh made the offer last March to this team and the greater body of 1,500 Zappos employees with separate deadlines, and ultimately 260 employees — 18% of the company — took some form of it.
It’s a big year for Hsieh (pronounced “shay”). His e-commerce site, known for its wide variety of shoes and headache-free customer service, is rebounding from this radical shakeup and now moving toward becoming a mobile-first company with significant profit growth.
Additionally, 2016 is the year that Hsieh’s other focus, the four-year-old Downtown Project movement to revitalize Zappos’ Las Vegas neighborhood, is supposed to finally bring back a return on the $350 million that Hsieh personally invested into it.
We recently sat down with Hsieh in Zappos’ Vegas headquarters to discuss his ambitions for the year, why he decided to reinvent the way his company operates, and why he thinks it will ultimately prove to be worth the struggle.
This interview has been edited for length and clarity.
FINAL Tony_Hsieh_bio
FINAL Tony_Hsieh_bio
(Samantha Lee/Business Insider)
Richard Feloni:
So here we are, January 2016. Looking back at 2015, what do you think? How did the year go?
Tony Hsieh: It was definitely an eventful year. There were a lot of changes both internally and externally here at Zappos. We went all in with Holacracy, which is really about self-organization, self-management, having employees really think about how to self-direct their work, rather than managers telling them what to do.
And then externally, on the customer side, we really made a strategy change and decided to focus on what we’re internally referring to as our “best customers” — really focusing on the brands they want, elevating the level of service, the amount of personal contact. So it’s been a pretty interesting and exciting transition on both of those ends.
Feloni: Let’s talk about Holacracy. You first heard about it at the 2012 Conscious Capitalism CEO Summit, and you then approached its creator, Brian Robertson, after his presentation on Holacracy. How did you decide the system was right for Zappos?
Hsieh: Holacracy happens to be the tool we’re using today, but the bigger theme is about self-organization and self-management.
Many years prior to meeting Brian, I had a nagging sensation that as we kept getting bigger, we kept getting more bureaucracy built into the corporate structure. Because I wanted to stop this trend, I was spending a lot of time thinking about how we could avoid losing a startup edge and how we could empower every employee to act like an entrepreneur.
I was looking at the weaknesses of the typical corporate structure and how it’s not been resilient. If you look at the Fortune 500 companies from 1955, 88% of them didn’t make it to 2014. Then you look at what structures do work in nature, like the human body, and they’re all structures that are self-organized. Frederic Laloux captures this best in his book “Reinventing Organizations,” where he refers to these as “Teal” organizations.
Feloni: Another book that has influenced you in this area is Harvard professor Edward Glaeser’s “Triumph of the City.”
Hsieh: The easiest example of self-organization for people to wrap their minds around is a city. The mayor of a city doesn’t tell its residents what to do or where to live, and when people and businesses act in their own self-interests, that creates opportunities for growth.
An interesting thing about cities is that Glaeser’s research has shown every time the population of a city doubles, innovation or productivity per resident increases by 15%, but the opposite happens when companies double in size.
Over the years at Zappos, I’ve done a lot of research into how we can prevent the default future for most companies: death. And not only how do we avoid that, but how do we become more innovative as we grow, in the same way that cities do? That’s why we pursued self-management.
Feloni: What do you think is the biggest misconception people have of Holacracy in particular, or self-management in general?
zappos employees
zappos employees
(Richard Feloni/Business Insider)
Zappos prides itself on exceptional customer service employees.
Hsieh:
The biggest misconception is that it’s just total chaos and there’s no structure. It’s interesting, because there actually is more structure in some cases and more explicit documentation on what people’s different roles are, what their account abilities are. It’s easy, though, to just read the headline of “No managers” and assume that that means no hierarchy. It’s actually a hierarchy of purpose.
Instead of a pyramid, power is distributed across different circles dedicated to specific functions — we have about 500 circles at Zappos, and they fit in a hierarchy relative to one another.
A problem with Holacracy is that it’s hard to explain very succinctly. Our training process takes awhile, and then even after you’ve gone through that, it still takes several months to really understand how to operate inside of it.
Another thing to remember whenever you hear someone explain how they either love or hate Holacracy at Zappos is that we’re in the super early days of it. It’s like this: If you got handed the latest iPhone running on the latest iOS, but there were no apps on it, then you would think that it was probably useless. Part of what we’re going through right now at Zappos is that we’re creating those apps for the Holacracy operating system. Since it’s the first time we’re doing it, some of those apps turn out to be great and some may be false starts, but it’s all an evolutionary discovery process and we share our findings with the world.
Hopefully, there are other companies out there that can borrow or modify our apps and then over time, there can be a whole ecosystem of companies that are thinking about “How can we move beyond the traditional command and control type of structure?” It makes the difficulties worth it.
FINAL Tony_Hsieh_by the numbers
FINAL Tony_Hsieh_by the numbers
(Samantha Lee/Business Insider)
Feloni: What were you seeing at Zappos that prompted you to offer a severance package to employees last March if they didn’t want to go all-in with Holacracy?
Hsieh: At that time, only 85% of the company had made the transition to the system. And what we found was that it was really hard for people to be half in one world and half in the other because, if under Holacracy they had certain authority to do something but their manager still functioned as if it were the old world, then conflict could arise. The default became falling back on habits, and so it hindered the whole adoption process. That’s why I set a hard deadline of moving to full implementation on May 1, so that we could just “rip the Band-Aid off.”
Feloni: About 14% of your employees left by May 1, and then by January 4, 50 more employees working on the Super Cloud outsourcing of the website’s basic functions to Amazon’s servers took an offer, for a total of 18% of the company. Did that hurt at all, to see that reaction?
Hsieh: So we put out a super generous offer, which we’ve done in the past anytime there were big transitions, like when we moved from San Francisco to Las Vegas in 2004. The offer then and the offer last year was they could either stay or take three months’ pay or one month’s pay for every year they worked, whichever was greater.
There were some employees that had been with us for over 12 years and basically they had the option to take a year’s severance.
This new environment isn’t right for everyone, because some employees just want to know what steps one to 10 are and be told by a manager that they’ve done a good job when they finish. In this new self-managed world, employees sign up for a role or a circle, and each of those has a purpose associated with it that employees have to figure out how to make come alive. And so it gives them a lot of freedom, but I understand at the same time that amount of freedom can be super scary for some people.
tony hsieh
tony hsieh
(Richard Feloni/Business Insider)
Hsieh, like nearly every Zappos employee, has an open desk cluttered with colorful decorations.
What we found, though, was, at least anecdotally, that about half of those who took the offer did so not because of Holacracy, but because they really had wanted to actually go out and do something else they were passionate about, like start their own business. Because now, with a year’s severance, for example, they had the funds to try it out and they also knew that they could, 12 months later, come back to Zappos, which we allowed them to do.
I heard a story about someone who took the offer because she considered it a good opportunity to take care of a sick family member in Texas.
Feloni: So do you feel like giving this offer was a necessary decision that you had to make?
Hsieh: It’s just more in line with how we’ve always done things at Zappos. We could have just as easily not given any offer and then just said, “This is what we’re doing.” But we’ve always prioritized company culture and how we treat employees. We actually still do this for all our new hires: They go through a five-week training program and at the end of the five weeks, they can take $2,000 and quit.
We want to make sure that employees aren’t here just for paychecks and truly believe this is the right place for them.
Feloni: And if your vision is realized, what will success look like under this new self-managed Zappos?
Hsieh: I want employees to operate in the intersection between what they’re passionate about and what’s going to help move the company forward. I want them to be able to come up with an idea and then, rather than having to go through a bureaucratic approval process, they can run with the idea and find people who’d like to join them.
And from the overall company’s perspective, I want to add more innovation and productivity as we add more employees. It goes back to the city analogy.
Another layer to that is that different mayors of different quality can come and go through the city, but the city stands throughout the change. In the same way the city isn’t dependent on a mayor, I’d ultimately like for Zappos’ future to not be dependent on me as its CEO.
I’d ultimately like for Zappos’ future to not be dependent on me as its CEO.
Feloni: Last year I spoke to John Bunch, head of the Holacracy implementation, and he essentially said that even if the company had to abandon Holacracy because it wasn’t working, the transitions that already were put in place would have been worth it. Is that something that you agree with?
Hsieh: Yeah, although I wouldn’t really think of trying something instead of Holacracy as abandoning it. I would think of it as we’re learning that there are some things about Holacracy that are great and then some things that maybe aren’t the best fit for our culture.
It would be like if I asked you, “Did Apple abandon the first iPhone?” You can either say they abandoned it or you can say they improved upon it over time.
Feloni: You told me last year that fewer decisions require your approval now at the company. Now that Zappos is fully functioning as a self-managed organization with distributed power, how has your role as CEO changed?
Tony_Hsieh_holacracy vs. hierarchy
Tony_Hsieh_holacracy vs. hierarchy
(Samantha Lee/Business Insider)
Click here to learn more about how Holacracy works >>
Hsieh: I would say in general, both historically and with Holacracy, I’ve always viewed my role as just kind of jumping around to wherever the organization needed me the most. And so over the past year and probably this year, as well, a lot of that is really focused on either Holacracy education or helping come up with systems or processes in this new world.
Feloni: You invested $350 million of your own money into Downtown Project in 2012, with the goal of revitalizing 50 acres of downtown Vegas. How was that an outgrowth of the ideas that you were exploring for Zappos?
Hsieh: When we first moved to downtown Vegas, we took over the former City Hall, which we’re sitting in right now, about two and a half years ago. And at the time this whole area was a lot more dangerous than it is today, and we wanted employees to be able to live, work, and play within walking distance of work. So the Downtown Project team and I wanted to help fund small businesses, tech startups, and a school and health clinic.
Though Zappos and Downtown Project are entirely separate, I wanted to encourage Zappos employees to go out into the community and to encourage people in the community to come onto Zappos’ campus, to have more of those innovation-driving “collisions” with other people, businesses, and industries.
Feloni: How do you feel about where Downtown Project is today?
Hsieh: When we started, the goal was that by the end of year five, which is the end of this year, was to make a profit. Right now, we’re pretty close to being on track for that goal.
The more interesting thing for me outside of the numbers is really, “Are small businesses and people not affiliated with us moving on their own to the area?” And the answer is, “Yes.” One of our intentions was to get to the tipping point where they came here because they like the vibe we created.
zappos headquarters
zappos headquarters
(Zappos)
Zappos’ downtown Las Vegas headquarters is in the old City Hall building.
Feloni:
You tried implementing Holacracy with the Downtown Project managing team, but they abandoned it in the fall of 2014. Were there lessons that you learned about implementing Holacracy and how it functioned that you were able to bring over to Zappos after trying it at Downtown Project?
Hsieh: In that case the timing wasn’t right for Downtown Project. The team was trying to build something significant from the ground up while also trying to learn Holacracy.
Whereas at Zappos, we have an existing business that, while we’re always trying to improve and so on, we’re not trying to figure out the entire business from scratch. We have more resources to figure out Holacracy.
Feloni: What do you think it is about your personality or your experience that drives this constant need for experimentation and trying new things?
Hsieh: There’s the creativity aspect of it, but it’s also rewarding for me to remove roadblocks to someone’s idea so that it can become reality.
Feloni: Do you ever doubt yourself as you’re going through the ambitious projects you take on?
Hsieh: I always doubt individual ideas, but I know that if you just do more of them, then statistically some of them are going to work. The ones that do work are the ones that you double down on.
In some ways it’s analogous to playing poker, where if you only play hands that you’re absolutely sure you’re going to win, you’re not going to be the best poker player or win the most money at the table. On the flip side, that doesn’t mean you play every hand, because you’re not going to make money.
I’ve always played, in poker and in business, for the highest expected value, and so even if there’s a 20% chance that something might work out, if the payoff’s going to be 10 times as much as you put in, then you should make that bet every single time.
If the payoff’s going to be 10 times as much as you put in, then you should make that bet every single time.
A lot of companies, especially bigger corporations, instead think, “Oh, 20% chance of success means 80% chance of failure — we should kill that project.” I’d rather say we should do 10 similar projects and then two of those will work out. Those could be the two that completely change the company.
Feloni: Was your decision to move from a spacious apartment into an Airstream trailer in the fall of 2014 one of those instances where you wanted to push yourself creatively?
Hsieh: I did it because I wanted to maximize serendipity and randomness in my life. If you lived in a house in the suburbs, your neighbors and friends don’t randomly walk into your house, in the same way that everyone in the Airstream park interacts with each other.
For example, two nights ago we had a bunch of musicians stop by, and Dan Reynolds, the lead singer of Imagine Dragons, starts a rap battle with another performer. That’s the type of situation you can’t plan for, but it happens all the time at the Airstream Park and generally happens a lot more in downtown Vegas than any other city I’ve been in.
Tony_Hsieh_why does he live in a trailer park
Tony_Hsieh_why does he live in a trailer park
(Samantha Lee/Business Insider)
Feloni: At this point, you’ve been a public figure long enough for people to either consider you a genius or crazy. How do you see yourself?
Hsieh: Probably neither. I don’t know. I just enjoy learning new things and then forming my own perspective of the world. By definition, because something I pursue is new or different, then it’s going to resonate with some people and not with others.
Feloni: You’ve said in other interviews that Zappos was never to you just about selling shoes or clothes, but that it’s been about building a culture internally and with customers. What do you want Zappos to become?
Hsieh: I would like it to be a whole new way of working and living that infects other companies. We like being at the forefront of newer things.
There are so many people working at bureaucratic, big corporations who are unhappy. Hopefully, we can help change that.
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On top of the initial post I need 7 slides.

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Human Resource Management

CIPD rejected the assignment, they claim the answers should focus on people’s pr

CIPD rejected the assignment, they claim the answers should focus on people’s profession (HR). The questions AC1.2, AC1.4, AC2.1, AC2.2, AC3.2, AC3.3 need to be re-written.
note: the attachment of the feedback of the assessor is not getting attached, i will be sending it to the writer after the order has been confirmed.

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Human Resource Management

Scenario You are the HR Manager in a shipping distribution company (make up what

Scenario
You are the HR Manager in a shipping distribution company (make up whatever name you want when writing this). Recently, it was discovered that several employees in the procurement department were committing fraud by accepting vendor kickbacks and by falsifying receipts to overstate the prices of items purchased for the company. These employees have been terminated from the organization. However, the CEO is worried that the unethical attitudes and practices may be more widespread within this department. Therefore, she has ordered that the entire department must undergo ethics training, and must switch to a new process for negotiating contracts, selecting vendors, and purchasing of the resources needed for the organization. The remaining employees in the department have all been working there for at least 15 years and will likely be resistant to adapting to the new required processes.
As HR Manager, you realize that as part of the planning for the new process implementation, you need to identify what factors would contribute the most to employee resistance as well as identify what actions could be taken to mitigate this resistance better. In order to determine this information, you decide to create a Force Field Analysis, as based on Kurt Lewin’s three-stage theory of change.
Instructions
• APA Format
• 9 Scholarly Citations (relevant2015 -2022)
• Always connect/relate back to the scenario, make up businesses, this needs to be done like a creative writing, so bring the imagination. (review the attached document with rubric specific information for further instructions and guidance it goes into great detail and provides you the information that needs to be discussed in each section).
Prepare a force field analysis that:
• Identifies the area for change in the procurement department.
• Performs all seven steps of the force field analysis.
• Creates a force field visual diagram with appropriate labels.
• Provides a narrative explanation of the analysis conducted.
• Describes that action steps selected for implementation along with the rationale for each action step.
• Provides attribution for credible sources used in the force field analysis.

Categories
Human Resource Management

Group paper project for Human Resource Management on Marriott International and

Group paper project for Human Resource Management on Marriott International and their HRM best practices. My HRM function is Benefits related. My sections for the paper that need to be completed are Introduction, overview of company and Benefits portion. Attached you will find the group paper outline (anything that says Nicole is what belongs to me and I have highlighted in yellow). I have also attached the annotated bibliography with available sources for my sections. Any extra sources are ofcourse allowed as long as they meet her requirements.
Question give in outline instruction that may assist in writing the paper.
What are the current “best practices” in HR for each function?
What are some implications for HR Practices in Other Companies?

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Human Resource Management

Q1: You have a successful track record of over 20+ years working with multinatio

Q1: You have a successful track record of over 20+ years working with multinational organizations across the Americas, Europe, and Asia and have managed board-level HR strategies, shaped cultures for business growth and transformation, and coached senior-level executives. Tell us about your massive professional journey so far and your life as the Group Chief Human Resources Officer of Aster DM Healthcare?
To be answered
Q2: The world of the future is not the world of capitalism, it’s the world of ‘talentism’. Organizations have acknowledged, more so after COVID-19, that the world of work is driven by employees and not the business. In the current context of work, how difficult does it seem to acquire, train, and retain good talent?
Globally, the health workforce has long suffered from labor shortages. This has been exacerbated by the workload increase caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Major collapses in healthcare systems across the world during the peak of the pandemic led to calls for strategies to alleviate the increasing job attrition problem within the healthcare sector.
If you build a house and the foundation is not solid, your home will begin to crumble over time. Nurses and clinicians are the foundation of healthcare, representing the largest segment of our organization. We have over 8000 nurses and over 4000 clinicians across Aster and as there is a global shortage of nursing staff and we see more instances of nurses leaving direct patient care itself (as part of a McKinsey survey: https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/around-the-world-nurses-say-meaningful-work-keeps-them-going), it is paramount that we do every bit to help retain our frontline talent in line with our brand promise “We’ll treat you well”.
We have a dedicated onboarding programs called NEST which gives opportunities for nurses to be trained by seasoned nursing educators and Chief Nursing Officers at our flagship hospitals once they have joined. Once on-boarded they become part of Aster Flagship Initiative Grow (Get Ready for Opportunities at Work), which aims at developing leaders amongst the nursing community to help them build careers across management tracks, taking up operational and leadership roles as well in our hospitals and clinics.
As per recent research by McKinsey one of the top reasons why nurses leave has to do with their well-being and environment, they operate in. Burnout is a key concern and to ensure well-being of our frontliners, our Well-Being Strategy called “Meet the Moment” centers around physical, financial, mental and emotional dimensions. We have monthly leadership led dedicated town halls to empower frontliners to share their thoughts, suggestions with us with a promise that we will listen and address their inputs. Recognition is a core theme in these leadership connects. For mental well-being, we have dedicated well-being sessions for nurses, which focuses on key mental health issues like burnout, anxiety, depression. To cascade a culture of well-being, we focused on creating Well-Being Champions amongst different functions and peer support groups and communities (Aster Support Groups) within our hospitals and clinics. Well-being is a shared responsibility.
There is a greater challenge than ever before in retaining (and attracting) frontline talent. To do it correctly, you have to balance the “hygiene” factors of employment – elements like compensation and working conditions – and the “motivators” – aspects that motivate employees to stay, such as positive peer relationships, meaningful work and overall well-being.
Q3: Outlining futuristic visions, building an in-sync team, and having a goal-oriented approach is imperative to drive businesses towards success. In your experience of strategic HR leadership, what are the most effective strategies HR professionals must implement to support ulterior business objectives?
The pandemic hit most of us hard. Today, we see teams playing a more critical role in helping organizations respond to crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Whole companies suddenly working from home as offices fall silent. Millions re-evaluating their lives and careers. The Great Resignations, Quite Quitting and Moon lighting have creeped into our everyday vocabulary. As we see Organizations grapple with the above complexities, there is also a systemic change from a management system based on old rules—a hierarchy that solves for uniformity, bureaucracy, and control to a more collaborative, network-based organization built around multi-disciplinary and agile teams.
There is a clarion call for a people and customer centric model that is more flexible and responsive, built around with a futuristic vision for the organisation while still being powered by deeper connections, and digitalization. Enabling agility and fluidity, organizing around employee experience by focusing on key employee moments that matter most, building sustainability through a diverse and inclusive culture, fortifying people and functional centres of excellence and centres of competence that drives business and organizational value through complex environments are some aspects that as HR professionals we must focus on.
While these trends are not new, they are approaching tipping points.
Q: As the conversations around the Future of Work become more aggressive, HR is expected to lead the agenda of future-proofing the workforce. However, what are some of the skills you think are required by the HR leaders and their teams to respond to the challenges and opportunities posed by the future of work?
The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted labor markets globally during 2020. According to a recent research conducted by Talogy (a talent management organization), attracting and retaining talent is the number 1 leadership challenge for the next 5 years and great leadership will become a key differentiator when trying to overcome this challenge. That being said, life has an amusing way of bringing us back to the basics. Today, if we look back at the origin of the word ‘Leader’, it was always defined as someone who is chosen by the people or for the people because of their ability to bring people together, influence and guide them towards a common objective. The future of leadership is also the same.
Leadership is no longer about preparing for digital disruption and transformation, but more about embracing and adapting to it. Leadership in the future is arguably more about humanizing than digitalizing: building trusting relationships, creating inclusive and supportive working environments, and fostering collaboration and communication across various work contexts. Considering that employees increasingly expect more people-centred leadership, few skills that HR leaders and teams can emphasize on would be:
• To be receptive, resilient, authentic, ethical and inclusive in order to drive change and enable engagement in a hybrid working environment.
• To maintain focus on connecting with people both as individuals and as a team.
• To develop a growth mindset and learning orientation and cascade below. Leaders must have a continuous desire to develop and improve to respond to future demands.
• To constantly coach and develop people, empowering them to deliver and setting them up for success.
https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work
https://hbr.org/2021/09/future-proofing-your-organization
Q: Reimagining human-machine collaboration is a crucial part of navigating business transformation for the future. However as the workplace and workforce become increasingly digital, people are longing for the human touch. How can we build a human-centric culture that engages talent?
We’re living through a time in which technology is advancing at a staggering rate. The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the convergence of several trends in the health care industry, particularly consumers prioritizing convenience and access to care. This lead to our digital transformation journey as a way to become more consumer-friendly while simultaneously changing our operations, culture, and use of technology.
In this massive transition of moving towards digital care, it bears reminding that digital adoption is a two-way street, requiring the satisfaction and buy-in of health care providers as well as patients. We understand that this transformation can be challenging for our employees, especially those who are providing direct care to our patients and thus it becomes extremely essential for us to have a human-centered approach that will help make this change in people’s mindset, culture, and decision-making capabilities a tad bit easier.
At Aster DM Healthcare, we believe that creating a human-centric culture is about embracing new practices that focus on bringing greater humanity in the way we lead, engage and grow employees, along with our business. From our recent culture survey in 2021, we understand that 95% of our employees are aligned with our purpose of providing quality care that is accessible and affordable globally. When employees feel that they are contributing to the bigger picture, they feel valued and important which becomes crucial when creating a human-centric culture.
Another key aspect to consider when building a human-centric culture, is to recognize employees. Recognizing achievement doesn’t only mean rewarding employees for accomplishing set goals and targets. Recognizing them for their great work in everyday tasks, for going the extra mile for a customer or proactively collaborating to solve a difficult problem is just as important. Paying attention to these details and awarding out-of-the-box thinking shows employees their impact and contributions. At Aster, we have monthly townhalls in each of our facilities to ensure that we do not miss a chance to recognize our employees apart from organization-wide initiatives such as ‘Gratitude in my Attitude’ where employees were encouraged to recognize each other on the ‘Yammer’ platform.
Last but not the least, leaders need to take responsibility in building the mental resilience and ensuring well-being of their teams before they can expect them to be at their best. At Aster, our brand promise is ‘We’ll Treat you well’ regardless of whether you are a patient or an employee. To build a culture of well-being, we encourage managers to have regular connects with their teams to gauge how team members are feeling. We also provide periodic counselling sessions for our employees through our in-house psychologists/mental health experts. We conduct mental health awareness town-halls for nurses and other periodic corporate wellbeing initiatives including talks and workshops. We are also in the final phase of the first responder training where employees are trained to aid other employees who are facing any mental health challenges and will also be spearheading Aster support groups.
To summarize, leaders that build a strong sense of purpose, encourage their employees to continuously grow through recognition and understand the importance of mental wellness have an amazing opportunity to create cultures that their employees will be proud to be part of.
https://hbr.org/2020/11/telehealth-is-working-for-patients-but-what-about-doctors
https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesbusinesscouncil/2020/07/09/key-questions-to-ask-yourself-when-creating-a-human-centric-culture/?sh=5fffa13c5ded
https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/patients-love-telehealth-physicians-are-not-so-sure
Q: We are already in the second half of the year 2022. Please share with our readers what you envision for the future of work in 2023?
As the world grapples through greater uncertainties such as living in a post pandemic world, high rates of inflation, changes in political institutions and leadership across the world and major humanitarian crises owing to the recent geo-political tensions and conflicts, I believe the future of work would be disruptive to say the least. Businesses and in turn employees will find themselves navigating through unchartered waters and it is important that at moments like these we double down on building capabilities such as empathy, curiosity, and a learning mindset in our workforce to steer us through what might lie ahead. While the future is uncertain, we know that technology will continue to shape the world and we must as HR practitioners learn to be agile and become a digital native. In all this culture will be the magic glue that will bind both the physical, in person and the hybrid workforce and as people champions, businesses will often rely on HR practitioners to guide them through an uncertain and yet an enterprising tomorrow. We should be ready to become the harbingers of change.
https://www.gartner.com/en/insights/future-of-work
https://www.mckinsey.com/capabilities/people-and-organizational-performance/our-insights/the-organization-blog/the-brave-new-business-world

Categories
Human Resource Management

Based on the paper and graphs give Recommendations (and Potential Issues) for A

Based on the paper and graphs give Recommendations (and Potential Issues) for Acme, and be related to the essay I post.
1. Possible solutions/improvements for gaps from the evaluation of data
Reasons why recommendation can help, meet the challenge/solve the problem
2. Unintended consequences
Possible solutions for those consequences

Categories
Human Resource Management

Q1: You have a successful track record of over 20+ years working with multinatio

Q1: You have a successful track record of over 20+ years working with multinational organizations across the Americas, Europe, and Asia and have managed board-level HR strategies, shaped cultures for business growth and transformation, and coached senior-level executives. Tell us about your massive professional journey so far and your life as the Group Chief Human Resources Officer of Aster DM Healthcare?
To be answered
Q2: The world of the future is not the world of capitalism, it’s the world of ‘talentism’. Organizations have acknowledged, more so after COVID-19, that the world of work is driven by employees and not the business. In the current context of work, how difficult does it seem to acquire, train, and retain good talent?
Globally, the health workforce has long suffered from labor shortages. This has been exacerbated by the workload increase caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Major collapses in healthcare systems across the world during the peak of the pandemic led to calls for strategies to alleviate the increasing job attrition problem within the healthcare sector.
If you build a house and the foundation is not solid, your home will begin to crumble over time. Nurses and clinicians are the foundation of healthcare, representing the largest segment of our organization. We have over 8000 nurses and over 4000 clinicians across Aster and as there is a global shortage of nursing staff and we see more instances of nurses leaving direct patient care itself (as part of a McKinsey survey: https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/around-the-world-nurses-say-meaningful-work-keeps-them-going), it is paramount that we do every bit to help retain our frontline talent in line with our brand promise “We’ll treat you well”.
We have a dedicated onboarding programs called NEST which gives opportunities for nurses to be trained by seasoned nursing educators and Chief Nursing Officers at our flagship hospitals once they have joined. Once on-boarded they become part of Aster Flagship Initiative Grow (Get Ready for Opportunities at Work), which aims at developing leaders amongst the nursing community to help them build careers across management tracks, taking up operational and leadership roles as well in our hospitals and clinics.
As per recent research by McKinsey one of the top reasons why nurses leave has to do with their well-being and environment, they operate in. Burnout is a key concern and to ensure well-being of our frontliners, our Well-Being Strategy called “Meet the Moment” centers around physical, financial, mental and emotional dimensions. We have monthly leadership led dedicated town halls to empower frontliners to share their thoughts, suggestions with us with a promise that we will listen and address their inputs. Recognition is a core theme in these leadership connects. For mental well-being, we have dedicated well-being sessions for nurses, which focuses on key mental health issues like burnout, anxiety, depression. To cascade a culture of well-being, we focused on creating Well-Being Champions amongst different functions and peer support groups and communities (Aster Support Groups) within our hospitals and clinics. Well-being is a shared responsibility.
There is a greater challenge than ever before in retaining (and attracting) frontline talent. To do it correctly, you have to balance the “hygiene” factors of employment – elements like compensation and working conditions – and the “motivators” – aspects that motivate employees to stay, such as positive peer relationships, meaningful work and overall well-being.
Q3: Outlining futuristic visions, building an in-sync team, and having a goal-oriented approach is imperative to drive businesses towards success. In your experience of strategic HR leadership, what are the most effective strategies HR professionals must implement to support ulterior business objectives?
The pandemic hit most of us hard. Today, we see teams playing a more critical role in helping organizations respond to crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Whole companies suddenly working from home as offices fall silent. Millions re-evaluating their lives and careers. The Great Resignations, Quite Quitting and Moon lighting have creeped into our everyday vocabulary. As we see Organizations grapple with the above complexities, there is also a systemic change from a management system based on old rules—a hierarchy that solves for uniformity, bureaucracy, and control to a more collaborative, network-based organization built around multi-disciplinary and agile teams.
There is a clarion call for a people and customer centric model that is more flexible and responsive, built around with a futuristic vision for the organisation while still being powered by deeper connections, and digitalization. Enabling agility and fluidity, organizing around employee experience by focusing on key employee moments that matter most, building sustainability through a diverse and inclusive culture, fortifying people and functional centres of excellence and centres of competence that drives business and organizational value through complex environments are some aspects that as HR professionals we must focus on.
While these trends are not new, they are approaching tipping points.
Q: As the conversations around the Future of Work become more aggressive, HR is expected to lead the agenda of future-proofing the workforce. However, what are some of the skills you think are required by the HR leaders and their teams to respond to the challenges and opportunities posed by the future of work?
The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted labor markets globally during 2020. According to a recent research conducted by Talogy (a talent management organization), attracting and retaining talent is the number 1 leadership challenge for the next 5 years and great leadership will become a key differentiator when trying to overcome this challenge. That being said, life has an amusing way of bringing us back to the basics. Today, if we look back at the origin of the word ‘Leader’, it was always defined as someone who is chosen by the people or for the people because of their ability to bring people together, influence and guide them towards a common objective. The future of leadership is also the same.
Leadership is no longer about preparing for digital disruption and transformation, but more about embracing and adapting to it. Leadership in the future is arguably more about humanizing than digitalizing: building trusting relationships, creating inclusive and supportive working environments, and fostering collaboration and communication across various work contexts. Considering that employees increasingly expect more people-centred leadership, few skills that HR leaders and teams can emphasize on would be:
• To be receptive, resilient, authentic, ethical and inclusive in order to drive change and enable engagement in a hybrid working environment.
• To maintain focus on connecting with people both as individuals and as a team.
• To develop a growth mindset and learning orientation and cascade below. Leaders must have a continuous desire to develop and improve to respond to future demands.
• To constantly coach and develop people, empowering them to deliver and setting them up for success.
https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work
https://hbr.org/2021/09/future-proofing-your-organization
Q: Reimagining human-machine collaboration is a crucial part of navigating business transformation for the future. However as the workplace and workforce become increasingly digital, people are longing for the human touch. How can we build a human-centric culture that engages talent?
We’re living through a time in which technology is advancing at a staggering rate. The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the convergence of several trends in the health care industry, particularly consumers prioritizing convenience and access to care. This lead to our digital transformation journey as a way to become more consumer-friendly while simultaneously changing our operations, culture, and use of technology.
In this massive transition of moving towards digital care, it bears reminding that digital adoption is a two-way street, requiring the satisfaction and buy-in of health care providers as well as patients. We understand that this transformation can be challenging for our employees, especially those who are providing direct care to our patients and thus it becomes extremely essential for us to have a human-centered approach that will help make this change in people’s mindset, culture, and decision-making capabilities a tad bit easier.
At Aster DM Healthcare, we believe that creating a human-centric culture is about embracing new practices that focus on bringing greater humanity in the way we lead, engage and grow employees, along with our business. From our recent culture survey in 2021, we understand that 95% of our employees are aligned with our purpose of providing quality care that is accessible and affordable globally. When employees feel that they are contributing to the bigger picture, they feel valued and important which becomes crucial when creating a human-centric culture.
Another key aspect to consider when building a human-centric culture, is to recognize employees. Recognizing achievement doesn’t only mean rewarding employees for accomplishing set goals and targets. Recognizing them for their great work in everyday tasks, for going the extra mile for a customer or proactively collaborating to solve a difficult problem is just as important. Paying attention to these details and awarding out-of-the-box thinking shows employees their impact and contributions. At Aster, we have monthly townhalls in each of our facilities to ensure that we do not miss a chance to recognize our employees apart from organization-wide initiatives such as ‘Gratitude in my Attitude’ where employees were encouraged to recognize each other on the ‘Yammer’ platform.
Last but not the least, leaders need to take responsibility in building the mental resilience and ensuring well-being of their teams before they can expect them to be at their best. At Aster, our brand promise is ‘We’ll Treat you well’ regardless of whether you are a patient or an employee. To build a culture of well-being, we encourage managers to have regular connects with their teams to gauge how team members are feeling. We also provide periodic counselling sessions for our employees through our in-house psychologists/mental health experts. We conduct mental health awareness town-halls for nurses and other periodic corporate wellbeing initiatives including talks and workshops. We are also in the final phase of the first responder training where employees are trained to aid other employees who are facing any mental health challenges and will also be spearheading Aster support groups.
To summarize, leaders that build a strong sense of purpose, encourage their employees to continuously grow through recognition and understand the importance of mental wellness have an amazing opportunity to create cultures that their employees will be proud to be part of.
https://hbr.org/2020/11/telehealth-is-working-for-patients-but-what-about-doctors
https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesbusinesscouncil/2020/07/09/key-questions-to-ask-yourself-when-creating-a-human-centric-culture/?sh=5fffa13c5ded
https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/patients-love-telehealth-physicians-are-not-so-sure
Q: We are already in the second half of the year 2022. Please share with our readers what you envision for the future of work in 2023?
As the world grapples through greater uncertainties such as living in a post pandemic world, high rates of inflation, changes in political institutions and leadership across the world and major humanitarian crises owing to the recent geo-political tensions and conflicts, I believe the future of work would be disruptive to say the least. Businesses and in turn employees will find themselves navigating through unchartered waters and it is important that at moments like these we double down on building capabilities such as empathy, curiosity, and a learning mindset in our workforce to steer us through what might lie ahead. While the future is uncertain, we know that technology will continue to shape the world and we must as HR practitioners learn to be agile and become a digital native. In all this culture will be the magic glue that will bind both the physical, in person and the hybrid workforce and as people champions, businesses will often rely on HR practitioners to guide them through an uncertain and yet an enterprising tomorrow. We should be ready to become the harbingers of change.
https://www.gartner.com/en/insights/future-of-work
https://www.mckinsey.com/capabilities/people-and-organizational-performance/our-insights/the-organization-blog/the-brave-new-business-world

Categories
Human Resource Management

Group paper project for Human Resource Management on Marriott International and

Group paper project for Human Resource Management on Marriott International and their HRM best practices. My HRM function is Benefits related. My sections for the paper that need to be completed are Introduction, overview of company and Benefits portion. Attached you will find the group paper outline (anything that says Nicole is what belongs to me and I have highlighted in yellow). I have also attached the annotated bibliography with available sources for my sections. Any extra sources are ofcourse allowed as long as they meet her requirements.
Question give in outline instruction that may assist in writing the paper.
What are the current “best practices” in HR for each function?
What are some implications for HR Practices in Other Companies?