Categories
Communication

“A white paper (or “whitepaper”) is an authoritative report or guide that often

“A white paper (or “whitepaper”) is an authoritative report or guide that often addresses issues and how to solve them. White papers are used to educate readers and help people make decisions.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_paper (Links to an external site.)
For our next assignment, you will produce two, 2-page white papers that will educate readers on best practices for Google Analytics and Google AdWords.
Google is essential in strategic communication as it helps to identify leads, show effectiveness of public relations tools, and show where to spend more/less of your budget as a public relations practitioner.
What is Google Analytics? What is Google AdWords?
By setting up a free, faux account you can test both tools. You should work to familiarize yourself with Google Analytics and Google Ad Words over the next week and explain via two white-papers the best practices on how to use both tools. Please keep in mind that you will be writing two reports that are 2 pages each.
Each white paper should not be a “How-to” set up a Google Analytics or AdWords account, but an explanation of best practices when launching either tool. Use this as if you were going to explain these tools to a client (again, you would be the one setting up the tools, but explaining to your client how to use the tools effectively to ensure ROI). Because both of these tools are extremely complex, you should focus on one topic within each (i.e. Google analytics: Boosting SEO, Google Adwords: Keyword Match).
Each whitepaper should include the following components:
identify an issue/problem
articulate a solution to that issue/problem
describe the value/impact of that solution
write in an engaging and highly readable way
include citations from at least two peer-reviewed, scholarly journal articles (PR Review, Journal of Public Relations, ETC)
make use of the library’s database system
quote the source
synthesize the source
devoid of spelling, grammar, and usage mistakes
Please read through sample white papers to familiarize yourself with the genre of a “white paper” and the purpose of these documents.

Categories
Communication

In this 6-7 minute presentation, you should persuade the class about a state or

In this 6-7 minute presentation, you should persuade the class about a state or local problem in need of a solution. The speech should follow the problem, cause, solution format discussed in class. For each section of the speech, 2 areas should be analyzed. So, at least 2 problems, 2 causes, and 2 solutions must be discussed in order to receive full credit for the body of the speech. The speech cannot be an analysis of an already solved problem—the problem must be a current problem for which there are identifiable causes for its persistence and viable solutions to lessen or eliminate the problem.
You should assume that your audience knows nothing about the topic that you choose.
A full-sentence outline needs to be turned in with the presentation. A reference page utilizing APA formatting is also required. Failure to turn in an outline before you begin your speech means you cannot give your speech and thus will receive a zero for this assignment.
A professional visual aid is required for this presentation. PowerPoint is the most utilized platform, but it is but one of many choices you have.
The presentation should be no shorter than 6 minutes and no longer than 8 minutes. You will be given 30 seconds leeway on either side of the time limit. For each additional 30 seconds under or over the time limit, there is a 10-point penalty.
8 different sources should be used in the presentation. All sources must be orally cited and cannot just appear in the bibliography. One citation should appear in the introduction. You must follow the oral citation guidelines discussed at length in class. Failure to do so will result in a substantial reduction in your grade. Remember, at the minimum, a full, orally cited source citation has the source (name (Professor Glenn Prince) and/or publication (The New York Times)) and full date (ex: August 21, 1981). If you can find the qualifications of your source, that should also be included to increase your credibility.
HAVE TO HAVE A FULL sentence outline!!!!!!!!!!

Categories
Communication

If you received a 0 on the Topic Proposal assignment, that means you did not sub

If you received a 0 on the Topic Proposal assignment, that means you did not submit a topic or you did not receive approval.
Remember this speech needs the following, from the Persuasive SPEECH ASSIGNMENT
6 sources total (minimum)
2 different sources per main point
A claim in the introduction (this is your thesis statement and should be a clear statement of topic & position)
In the body, a single counterclaim – what do those who disagree with you believe? Briefly but fairly state their position.
Following the counterclaim, a rebuttal: evidence that proves the counterclaim wrong
Every main point should have a warrant: YOUR words that explain why the research proves your claim.
The conclusion should contain a Call to Action – if you have been successful persuading your audience, what do you want them to do/think?

Categories
Communication

Discuss TWO rhetorical moves that are made in the textual reading. Responses sho

Discuss TWO rhetorical moves that are made in the textual reading. Responses should be two paragraphs – one for each rhetorical move/term chosen.

Categories
Communication

The Company is Forever 21 The 2 international countries are Belgium and Germany

The Company is Forever 21
The 2 international countries are Belgium and Germany. Steps 1,2 and 3 from the previous assignment if needed, I can send them to you. Please let me know.
This assignment has 3 steps 4, 5, and 6. Please read carefully before proceeding. At completion, you will have a report with an executive summary of 1 page ONLY. Two to three-minute narrative presentation with a closed caption if possible. PowerPoint is ok. Then lastly a Presentation Transcriipt.
STEP 4: Assess Financial Fit
misty bridge flanked with statues
Neal Wilson / Moment Collection / Getty
Now that you’ve assessed the communications needs in your markets, you’ll conduct a high-level estimate of the financial feasibility of each move. This shouldn’t take much time once you have the financial information you need, but it’s a separate step because, if you haven’t done this before, you’ll need to know how to locate and understand financial documents.
Every organization wants to bring in money, whether as profit (private), grants or donations (nonprofit), or appropriations (government), as outlined in Budgeting by Sector. You likely won’t have much of a sense of how much money the expansion would bring in, but you can at least look at how much your client has to spend and weigh it against (1) what you know it would take to launch a successful communications campaign, and (2) the possible ROI of that campaign, or the effect of the communications on reputation and sentiment. Your assessment of the financial viability of the move from a communications perspective will be hugely interesting to the C-suite and should be a nontrivial part of your presentation. You don’t want to recommend a Cadillac-sized budget if your client can afford only a Chevrolet—or, if you do recommend the Cadillac budget, you want to provide evidence that there will be a high ROI.
First, assess the financial health of your client. Understanding the financial situation of a company is not as daunting a challenge as it might sound. If you’ve never looked at financial documents before, this step will be a great way to get to know the basics of how to estimate an organization’s health.
Find the Information
You may find what you need in the library; for guidance, review the Company Information resources.
If you can’t find what you need using the library databases, there are a number of other options available to you. First, if the company is publicly traded—that is, anyone can buy or sell shares on a stock exchange (SEC, 2020)—the company’s financial documents and other information are available online. First, try a Google search with your client’s name and the keywords investor page. You may also be able to find information on the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) website or other sites that aggregate data found on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ), and other stock exchanges.
Even if your company isn’t public, it might provide annual reports or other documents that contain financial information. Nonprofits that make more than $100,000 in annual contributions or have over $250,000 in assets are required to file an IRS Form 990, which you should be able to find via a search (Bridgespan, 2020). For federal agencies, the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) website provides links to financial documents (n.d.).
If you’re unable to find the information you need on your particular company, find a similar company and use its numbers. Be sure to provide this information in the discussion below as well as in your deliverable at the end of this step.
Use the Information
As you review the financial information of your company, remember that the balance sheet shows total assets and liabilities calculated on a specified date, the cash flow statement shows the operating performance, or net cash income and outflows for a given time period, and the income statement or profit and loss (P&L) statement reports the profitability of a business for a stated time, showing revenues minus expenses. Looking at these three documents together should give you a sense of the financial situation of your client at this point in time. One of the most important documents is the income, or P&L, statement. The expenditures tell you how much your company spends in a given time period. This information can help you estimate how much your client might be prepared to spend on an expansion communications campaign.
Create a financial profile of your client—no more than a few sentences or bullet points. Estimate how much you think your company might be willing to invest in this expansion.
Now that you’ve assessed your client’s financial situation, look at the tactics and timelines you’ve developed for your two markets, as well as all your research notes, and consider how costly it might be for the company to move into either market. You of course know only what the communications department needs in the way of resources, but a market that is more expensive for you is likely more expensive for the other departments.
You’re operating at a high level here, but consider factors such as,
exchange rate;
translation needs;
staffing, contracting, or consulting needs;
travel and transportation needs (even if your campaign is entirely online, you’ll want to make at least one visit to the market a year to meet with cultural liaisons and get to know stakeholders);
owned, earned, and social media needs;
research and evaluation needs;
sociocultural variables;
and so forth.
Take into account what your company might stand to gain in either market.
Once you have a high-level sense of the relative financial costs and benefits of moving into the two markets, write a summary of your findings and state which alternative makes the most sense to you from a financial perspective.
STEP 5: Determine ROI
church spires with colorful flags waving out front
Rob Tilley / Corbis Documentary / Getty
Now that you’ve assessed the financial costs and benefits of expanding into each market, evaluate all the information you’ve gathered. Taking your client’s mission, vision, values, business goals, and business objectives into account, and thinking about the opportunities and risks you identified in each market, estimate the overall ROI offered by each expansion option. There is no one right way to do this; it’s a matter of assessing what is important to your client and determining what choice would confer the most overall value.
Your strategic communications perspective is an essential part of the equation, though. Factor in the communications costs against the perceived benefits: to what extent can you expect to establish relationships with stakeholders and publics, and over how much time? In which market will you yield the greatest return for the investment you’re putting forth? What challenges might you face, and is the risk worth it? And, is your client equipped to provide the resources your team will need to conduct its work?
Also consider the benefits and hurdles other departments might face.
Take a look at Considering ROI in Decision Making for a strategic-communications-oriented approach to assessing ROI. ROI can mean different things to different functions, and the readings could help you make a case for some of the intangible benefits you might be able to see through the lens of your particular discipline and experiences.
Your calculus here will be the basis of the executive summary, in which you succinctly make your recommendation and provide a compelling, high-level rationale.
STEP 6: Compose Your Products for the C-Suite (Submission)
misty bridge flanked with statues
Chan Srithaweeporn / Moment Collection / Getty
Now that you’ve performed your evaluation of the two expansion options and chosen the one you think will confer the best ROI, you’ll write or refine your report, then produce your executive summary. Once you’re finished with those, you’ll put together a clean, colorful, and convincing presentation.
Populate your report and presentation with at least three visuals. Cite all information and visuals from other sources in APA style.
Your report and the other two products should demonstrate your ability to make a convincing argument and write persuasively. Backing your contributions with qualitative and quantitative data is one way to provide a convincing rationale; your graphics should assist with this.
Also remember the power of storytelling to reach your publics. If you can create a narrative about your findings, or a story within your findings, this can be a powerful persuasive tool.
Organize your report however you wish, but make sure that it
provides a recommendation from a communications perspective;
defends that recommendation throughout the report;
compares and contrasts the two markets based on at least the following factors:
political climate,
economic climate,
business climate,
laws,
ethics,
culture,
communication norms, and
risk;
outlines communications planning needs for each market (goals and objectives; information about publics and their demographic, psychographic, and information consumption and engagement characteristics; messages; strategies; tactics, 12-month timeline; and evaluation); and
provides a financial analysis.
Your executive summary should be no longer than one page and should reinforce the main takeaway of your report.
For your presentation, create a dynamic, high-level two-to-three-minute narrated overview of your findings and recommendation. If you’re not feeling inspired by PowerPoint, try another tool such as Adobe Spark; you can get a free account with Adobe and create a slideshow with high-quality photographs, icons, text, and voiceover. Some people love Powtoon, which has a free version as well. You can also record videos using Zoom and other web conferencing software. There are lots of great tools out there that are worth getting to know as remote presentations become more common.
Provide a transcriipt to accompany your presentation. If you uploaded it to YouTube, import your transcriipt there as well so that the video will have accurate closed captions. Anyone at the company who needs or wants to will be able to be listen to the transcriipt via screen reader or read the captions along with the video. Many employers have disability rules or abide by Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations, so you always want to provide alternative means of accessing media content (DOJ, n.d.).

Categories
Communication

The Company is Forever 21 The 2 international countries are Belgium and Germany

The Company is Forever 21
The 2 international countries are Belgium and Germany. Steps 1,2 and 3 from the previous assignment if needed, I can send them to you. Please let me know.
This assignment has 3 steps 4, 5, and 6. Please read carefully before proceeding. At completion, you will have a report with an executive summary of 1 page ONLY. Two to three-minute narrative presentation with a closed caption if possible. PowerPoint is ok. Then lastly a Presentation Transcriipt.
STEP 4: Assess Financial Fit
misty bridge flanked with statues
Neal Wilson / Moment Collection / Getty
Now that you’ve assessed the communications needs in your markets, you’ll conduct a high-level estimate of the financial feasibility of each move. This shouldn’t take much time once you have the financial information you need, but it’s a separate step because, if you haven’t done this before, you’ll need to know how to locate and understand financial documents.
Every organization wants to bring in money, whether as profit (private), grants or donations (nonprofit), or appropriations (government), as outlined in Budgeting by Sector. You likely won’t have much of a sense of how much money the expansion would bring in, but you can at least look at how much your client has to spend and weigh it against (1) what you know it would take to launch a successful communications campaign, and (2) the possible ROI of that campaign, or the effect of the communications on reputation and sentiment. Your assessment of the financial viability of the move from a communications perspective will be hugely interesting to the C-suite and should be a nontrivial part of your presentation. You don’t want to recommend a Cadillac-sized budget if your client can afford only a Chevrolet—or, if you do recommend the Cadillac budget, you want to provide evidence that there will be a high ROI.
First, assess the financial health of your client. Understanding the financial situation of a company is not as daunting a challenge as it might sound. If you’ve never looked at financial documents before, this step will be a great way to get to know the basics of how to estimate an organization’s health.
Find the Information
You may find what you need in the library; for guidance, review the Company Information resources.
If you can’t find what you need using the library databases, there are a number of other options available to you. First, if the company is publicly traded—that is, anyone can buy or sell shares on a stock exchange (SEC, 2020)—the company’s financial documents and other information are available online. First, try a Google search with your client’s name and the keywords investor page. You may also be able to find information on the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) website or other sites that aggregate data found on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ), and other stock exchanges.
Even if your company isn’t public, it might provide annual reports or other documents that contain financial information. Nonprofits that make more than $100,000 in annual contributions or have over $250,000 in assets are required to file an IRS Form 990, which you should be able to find via a search (Bridgespan, 2020). For federal agencies, the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) website provides links to financial documents (n.d.).
If you’re unable to find the information you need on your particular company, find a similar company and use its numbers. Be sure to provide this information in the discussion below as well as in your deliverable at the end of this step.
Use the Information
As you review the financial information of your company, remember that the balance sheet shows total assets and liabilities calculated on a specified date, the cash flow statement shows the operating performance, or net cash income and outflows for a given time period, and the income statement or profit and loss (P&L) statement reports the profitability of a business for a stated time, showing revenues minus expenses. Looking at these three documents together should give you a sense of the financial situation of your client at this point in time. One of the most important documents is the income, or P&L, statement. The expenditures tell you how much your company spends in a given time period. This information can help you estimate how much your client might be prepared to spend on an expansion communications campaign.
Create a financial profile of your client—no more than a few sentences or bullet points. Estimate how much you think your company might be willing to invest in this expansion.
Now that you’ve assessed your client’s financial situation, look at the tactics and timelines you’ve developed for your two markets, as well as all your research notes, and consider how costly it might be for the company to move into either market. You of course know only what the communications department needs in the way of resources, but a market that is more expensive for you is likely more expensive for the other departments.
You’re operating at a high level here, but consider factors such as,
exchange rate;
translation needs;
staffing, contracting, or consulting needs;
travel and transportation needs (even if your campaign is entirely online, you’ll want to make at least one visit to the market a year to meet with cultural liaisons and get to know stakeholders);
owned, earned, and social media needs;
research and evaluation needs;
sociocultural variables;
and so forth.
Take into account what your company might stand to gain in either market.
Once you have a high-level sense of the relative financial costs and benefits of moving into the two markets, write a summary of your findings and state which alternative makes the most sense to you from a financial perspective.
STEP 5: Determine ROI
church spires with colorful flags waving out front
Rob Tilley / Corbis Documentary / Getty
Now that you’ve assessed the financial costs and benefits of expanding into each market, evaluate all the information you’ve gathered. Taking your client’s mission, vision, values, business goals, and business objectives into account, and thinking about the opportunities and risks you identified in each market, estimate the overall ROI offered by each expansion option. There is no one right way to do this; it’s a matter of assessing what is important to your client and determining what choice would confer the most overall value.
Your strategic communications perspective is an essential part of the equation, though. Factor in the communications costs against the perceived benefits: to what extent can you expect to establish relationships with stakeholders and publics, and over how much time? In which market will you yield the greatest return for the investment you’re putting forth? What challenges might you face, and is the risk worth it? And, is your client equipped to provide the resources your team will need to conduct its work?
Also consider the benefits and hurdles other departments might face.
Take a look at Considering ROI in Decision Making for a strategic-communications-oriented approach to assessing ROI. ROI can mean different things to different functions, and the readings could help you make a case for some of the intangible benefits you might be able to see through the lens of your particular discipline and experiences.
Your calculus here will be the basis of the executive summary, in which you succinctly make your recommendation and provide a compelling, high-level rationale.
STEP 6: Compose Your Products for the C-Suite (Submission)
misty bridge flanked with statues
Chan Srithaweeporn / Moment Collection / Getty
Now that you’ve performed your evaluation of the two expansion options and chosen the one you think will confer the best ROI, you’ll write or refine your report, then produce your executive summary. Once you’re finished with those, you’ll put together a clean, colorful, and convincing presentation.
Populate your report and presentation with at least three visuals. Cite all information and visuals from other sources in APA style.
Your report and the other two products should demonstrate your ability to make a convincing argument and write persuasively. Backing your contributions with qualitative and quantitative data is one way to provide a convincing rationale; your graphics should assist with this.
Also remember the power of storytelling to reach your publics. If you can create a narrative about your findings, or a story within your findings, this can be a powerful persuasive tool.
Organize your report however you wish, but make sure that it
provides a recommendation from a communications perspective;
defends that recommendation throughout the report;
compares and contrasts the two markets based on at least the following factors:
political climate,
economic climate,
business climate,
laws,
ethics,
culture,
communication norms, and
risk;
outlines communications planning needs for each market (goals and objectives; information about publics and their demographic, psychographic, and information consumption and engagement characteristics; messages; strategies; tactics, 12-month timeline; and evaluation); and
provides a financial analysis.
Your executive summary should be no longer than one page and should reinforce the main takeaway of your report.
For your presentation, create a dynamic, high-level two-to-three-minute narrated overview of your findings and recommendation. If you’re not feeling inspired by PowerPoint, try another tool such as Adobe Spark; you can get a free account with Adobe and create a slideshow with high-quality photographs, icons, text, and voiceover. Some people love Powtoon, which has a free version as well. You can also record videos using Zoom and other web conferencing software. There are lots of great tools out there that are worth getting to know as remote presentations become more common.
Provide a transcriipt to accompany your presentation. If you uploaded it to YouTube, import your transcriipt there as well so that the video will have accurate closed captions. Anyone at the company who needs or wants to will be able to be listen to the transcriipt via screen reader or read the captions along with the video. Many employers have disability rules or abide by Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations, so you always want to provide alternative means of accessing media content (DOJ, n.d.).

Categories
Communication

Discuss TWO rhetorical moves that are made in the textual reading. Responses sho

Discuss TWO rhetorical moves that are made in the textual reading. Responses should be two paragraphs – one for each rhetorical move/term chosen.

Categories
Communication

I believe my introduction is sufficient. I would like proofing of this and then

I believe my introduction is sufficient. I would like proofing of this and then the critical review completed. I am using someone else’s study to do a mock study. It is supposed to be my study as I have made changes to make it my own. I am stuck with this critical review section. It needed at a minimum 200 data points. The study I chose only had 75 to 100. I have said I had 200-250 to meet this requirement. The critical review requires visulization in conjunction to the answers to the questions. I assume charts to show the data and what I am saying in each of 5 questions true. This is the text book, it needs to be referenced. In chapter 4 he addresses the question section. Illustrations need to be added of reach of the 5 questions. I feel he just wants the concepts defined by the guidance and reference to the book and other sources for each question, then pull from my study to give an example of each concept being defined.
Data Visualisation: A Handbook for Data Driven Design 2ND 19
Author: Kirk, Andy
ISBN-13: 978-1-5264-6892-5
ISBN-10: 1-5264-6892-1
Edition/Copyright: 2ND 19
Publisher: Sage Publications, Inc.
Summary
Digital Rights
Requirements

Categories
Communication

I believe my introduction is sufficient. I would like proofing of this and then

I believe my introduction is sufficient. I would like proofing of this and then the critical review completed. I am using someone else’s study to do a mock study. It is supposed to be my study as I have made changes to make it my own. I am stuck with this critical review section. It needed at a minimum 200 data points. The study I chose only had 75 to 100. I have said I had 200-250 to meet this requirement. The critical review requires visulization in conjunction to the answers to the questions. I assume charts to show the data and what I am saying in each of 5 questions true. This is the text book, it needs to be referenced. In chapter 4 he addresses the question section. Illustrations need to be added of reach of the 5 questions. I feel he just wants the concepts defined by the guidance and reference to the book and other sources for each question, then pull from my study to give an example of each concept being defined.
Data Visualisation: A Handbook for Data Driven Design 2ND 19
Author: Kirk, Andy
ISBN-13: 978-1-5264-6892-5
ISBN-10: 1-5264-6892-1
Edition/Copyright: 2ND 19
Publisher: Sage Publications, Inc.
Summary
Digital Rights
Requirements

Categories
Communication

Already attached my own original jingle, MGT IMG IDEN/REPU, please 1. Everyone

Already attached my own original jingle, MGT IMG IDEN/REPU, please 1. Everyone creates your own original jingle; write what it is for and what strategies you used in this jingle. (from what we learned in class) (jingle can be about anything you want and can be only music without lyrics or with lyrics)